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Tim Cuppett Architects

Neighborhood: Frio Cañon, Leakey, Texas 78873
New Construction

1,980 (main house), 990 (cottages), 650 (art studio/meditation room)

A multi-family compound rises from a remote, grassy valley on the bank of the Frio River deep in the Texas Hill Country. The goal for this project was to create shelters with an environmental experience unique to its place where summer madness gives way to winter stillness; where city life and digital stimulation are replaced by the experience of feeling a cool breeze or snuggling up to a warm fire.

Structures consist of a main house, meditation room over art studio/garage, and two guest studio cottages. The main house and cottages are linked by a slightly elevated walkway which enables barefoot kids to run back and forth over the tall grass. A “breezeway” bookended by concealed multi-slide doors bisects the main house, enabling alfresco dining most of the year; alternatively, the space is zoned and can be enclosed for heating. Screened porches, front and back, envelop cozy living chambers. Secondary sleeping spaces occupy an attic that spans the rear porch of the main house while cottages feature open “kids’” lofts.  Structures were detailed for simplicity of construction with readily available, local materials and fashioned by local tradesmen.

New Construction

1,980 (main house), 990 (cottages), 650 (art studio/meditation room)

A multi-family compound rises from a remote, grassy valley on the bank of the Frio River deep in the Texas Hill Country. The goal for this project was to create shelters with an environmental experience unique to its place where summer madness gives way to winter stillness; where city life and digital stimulation are replaced by the experience of feeling a cool breeze or snuggling up to a warm fire.

Structures consist of a main house, meditation room over art studio/garage, and two guest studio cottages. The main house and cottages are linked by a slightly elevated walkway which enables barefoot kids to run back and forth over the tall grass. A “breezeway” bookended by concealed multi-slide doors bisects the main house, enabling alfresco dining most of the year; alternatively, the space is zoned and can be enclosed for heating. Screened porches, front and back, envelop cozy living chambers. Secondary sleeping spaces occupy an attic that spans the rear porch of the main house while cottages feature open “kids’” lofts.  Structures were detailed for simplicity of construction with readily available, local materials and fashioned by local tradesmen.